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Why is the flag of Prague yellow and red?

Why is the flag of Prague yellow and red?



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Wikipedia's flag for Prague shows red and yellow. I think that the red comes from flag of Bohemia and yellow from flag of Habsburgs, but that is just a hypothesis.


I would like to try answer this question. According to this article which is unfrotunately only in Czech:

From the main colors of the emblem, the colors of the Prague battalion were derived in the 19th century. In the following years only the accompanying pieces of the emblem change, the shield itself has remained unchanged up to the present.

The reason why it was chosen by Prague's mayor in 1991 is because the red and yellow flag can be use for free, without of permission from the Prague town hall.

The historical flag is much more interesting. The appearance come out from attributes from 14th century. There are three turrets with gate and wall. The colour of the turrets was silver but for the help Frederick the third it was changed to gold. Only the battlements stay silver.

The hand with sword was add by Ferdinand II as acknowledgement for Prague to successful defence against the Swedish army in Thirty Year War.

So this possibly can answer this question. The colors is really common in Bohemia country attributes.


It seems somewhat coincidental. According to this page about Prague flags:

Historic City of Prague Flags

In 1784, the Austrian Emperor Josef II by Imperial decree incorporated the four separate towns of Prague ( Old Town, New Town, Lesser Town and Hradschin-Castle ) into one city ruled by a single Magistrate. The Magistrate offices were located in the Old Town hall and the arms and flag of Old Town became those of a new capital. The Old Town flag then consisted of two horizontal stripes, black and yellow, which were the colors of the municipal arms in 1622. Unfortunately, they were identical with colors of the Habsburg dynasty which made the Prague "landesfarben" not very popular among Czech citizens.

In 1886, the Municipal Council asked the painter B. Wachsmann to paint new municipal arms, colors and seals for Prague, which he did making the new colors of Prague yellow and red. Since that time, a horizontally divided flag of yellow and red has been considered the official municipal flag of Prague. The new flags in those colors became symbols of Prague and were first used extensively for the Jubilee Exhibition of 1891.

This flag is sometimes confused with the traditional flag of Moravia. The colors used on the flags are simply "coincidental" and based on the heraldic rules used when making flags from the colors of coat-of-arms. Other than the colors, they are not related.

The City of Prague is actually made up of almost 100 small towns that were absorbed as the city grew. Today, the towns have become districts, each with their own unique flag.

I take it that by "based on the heraldic rules used when making flags from the colors of coat-of-arms" the page's author means the heraldry rule whereby you're supposed to interlace colors (that is, green, red, blue, etc.) with metal (gold or silver) so that colors only touch metal and vice versa. If memory serves, black and white could be used as either color or metal.

There's a bunch more historical flags on this other page from the same site, which notes in passing on the 1477 old town flag's entry that:

In 1477, the Bohemian King Vladislaus II divided the flag of Old Town into three stripes of red, yellow, and white replacing the older black and yellow of the Hapsburgs.

Put another way, and as you'll see viewing the flag pictures, the gold/red theme in the flag has been around since the middle pages and doesn't seem to be tied to the Habsburgs outside of not wanting to use the latter's black/gold theme. And the current pick of flag in 1886 appears to be a simple matter of an artist applying heraldry best practices.

There might be more/better sources in Czech that go into the precise meaning of the gold/red pick, why this design in particular, etc. Be wary if look outside of Prague for explanations if you research this deeper, because one locality's explanation for a pick of color and design often is different from another's.


Star of David

The Star of David, known in Hebrew as Magen David ( מָגֵן דָּוִד ‎, transl. "Shield of David" ), [a] is a generally-recognized symbol of modern Jewish identity and Judaism. [1] Its shape is that of a hexagram, the compound of two equilateral triangles.

The identification of the terms "Star of David" and "Shield of David" with the hexagram shape dates back to the 17th century. The term "Shield of David" is also used in the Siddur, a Jewish prayerbook, as a title for the God of Israel. Most notably, the star is used as a central symbol on the national flag of the State of Israel.


The story behind the white and yellow colors of the Vatican flag

L’Osservatore Romano published an article last week explaining how Pope Pius VII decided in 1808 that the Vatican colors would be white and yellow. Historian Claudio Ceresa explained the history behind the Pope’s choice.

In an article entitled, “Two centuries of yellow and white as the papal colors,” Ceresa explained that in order to understand why the colors were chosen, one must consider the “occupation of the city by Napoleonic troops in February of 1808.”

“The commander of the French forces, General Miollis, posted notices on the walls informing that the Pope’s army would be incorporated into the imperial forces. Those officials who remained loyal to Pius VII were to be arrested and deported,” Ceresa explained. “Reaction was minimal because it was reported that the Pontiff was aware and did not resist. Only a small group of loyalists were deported to a prison in Mantova.”

“In order to underscore the unification, and probably to increase the situation of uncertainty as well,” Ceresa continued, “the papal soldiers were allowed to continue using the distinctive yellow-red colors on their hats.”

Ceresa afterwards noted that the Pope “did not want the Vatican State to be subject to Napoleon, and therefore on March 13, 1808 he forcefully protested. He ordered, among other things, that the units that were still loyal to him substitute the Roman insignia colors with white and yellow.”

Abbot Luca Antonio Benedetalla wrote in his diary on the same date that “in order not to confuse the Roman soldiers who were under French command with the few that remained in his service, the Pope ordered the new yellow and white insignia. The noble guard and the Swiss have adopted it. They like it,” he wrote.

Ceresa explained that three days later, on March 16, 1808, Pius VII sent the order in writing to the diplomatic corps, the document is considered to be the act creating the colors of the current flag of Vatican City.”


Contents

After the death of Charlemagne, the present-day territory of Belgium (except the County of Flanders) became part of Lotharingia, which had a flag of two horizontal red stripes separated by a white stripe. [1] The territory then passed into Spanish hands, and after the coronation of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, yellow and red, the colours of Spain, were added. From the 16th century to the end of the 18th century, the colours of what is now Belgium were red, white and yellow. [1] Occasionally, the red cross of Burgundy was placed on the white section of the flag. [1]

During the period of Austrian rule, a number of different flags were tried. Eventually, the Austrian Emperor imposed the Austrian flag. The population of Brussels was opposed to this, and, following the example of France, red, yellow and black cockades began to appear, those being the colours of Brabant. [1] The colours thus correspond to the red lion of Hainaut, Limburg and Luxembourg, the yellow lion of Brabant, and the black lion of Flanders and Namur. [1]

On 26 August 1830, the day after the rioting at the Brussels Opera and the start of the Belgian Revolution, the flag of France flew from the city hall of Brussels. The insurgents hastily replaced it with a tricolour of red, yellow, and black horizontal stripes (similar to the one used during the Brabant Revolution [1] of 1789–1790 which had established the United States of Belgium) made at a nearby fabric store. As a result, Article 193 of the Constitution of Belgium describes the colours of the Belgian nation as Red, Yellow, and Black, the reverse order shown in the official flag. [2]

On 23 January 1831, the stripes changed from horizontal to vertical, and on 12 October, the flag attained its modern form, with the black placed at the hoist side of the flag. [1]

The official guide to protocol in Belgium states that the national flag measures 2.6 m (8.5 ft) tall for each 3 m (9.8 ft) wide, [1] giving it a ratio of 13:15. Each of the stripes is one-third of the width of the flag. The yellow is in fact yellow and not the darker gold of the flag of Germany, which is a black-red-gold tricolour, striped horizontally.

Colour scheme Black Yellow Red
Pantone [1] Black Yellow 115 Red 32
CMYK [1] 0-0-0-100 0-6-87-0 0-86-63-0
RGB [3] 0-0-0 253-218-36 239-51-64
Hex triplet #000000 #FDDA24 #EF3340

National flag and civil ensign Edit

The national flag has the unusual proportions of 13:15. The 2:3 flag is the civil ensign, the correct flag for use by civilians at sea. [4]

Naval ensign and jack Edit

The naval ensign of Belgium has the three national colours in a saltire, on a white field, with a black crown above crossed cannons at the top and a black anchor at the bottom. It was created in 1950, shortly after the Belgian Navy was re-established, having been a section of the British Royal Navy during World War II, and it is reminiscent of the white ensign of the Royal Navy. [5]

There is also an official Belgian naval jack, which is the same as the national flag, except in a 1:1 ratio, making it square. [5]

Royal standard and flags on the royal palaces Edit

The royal standard of Belgium is the personal standard of the current king, Philippe, and features his monogram, an 'F' (for the Dutch 'Filip'), crossed with a 'P' in the four corners. The designs of royal standards of past monarchs have been similar. [6]

Notably, the flag of Belgium flown on the Royal Palace of Brussels and the Royal Castle of Laeken is in none of the proportions above. It has the irregular 4:3 ratio, making it taller than it is wide. [6] The stripes remain vertical. These proportions are explained as an aesthetic consideration, as the palaces are large, and the flags are thus viewed from far below, which makes them look more normal due to foreshortening. [6]

The flags are flown above the palaces when the king is in Belgium, not necessarily just in one of the palaces. The flags are not flown if the king is on a state visit overseas or on holiday outside of Belgium. [6] There have been exceptions to this rule, but, in general, presence or absence of the flag is a reasonably reliable indicator of whether or not the king is in the country.

As Belgium is a federal state, the flag of Belgium and the flags of the communities or regions in principle occupy the same rank. [1] Nonetheless, when flags are raised and lowered or carried in a procession, the national flag takes precedence over all the others. [1]

The order of precedence is: [1]

  1. The national flag of Belgium
  2. The flag of the community or region of Belgium
  3. The European flag
  4. The flags of the provinces of Belgium, in alphabetical order in the local language, if more than one is flown
  5. The flag of the municipality

If there is a visiting head of state, that country's flag may be set second in precedence, all other flags dropping a rank. [1]


Flag of Germany

Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article.

horizontally striped national flag of black, red, and “gold” (i.e., golden yellow) when used for official purposes, it may incorporate a central eagle shield. The flag has a width-to-length ratio of 3 to 5.

The Holy Roman Empire, prior to its abolition in 1806 during the Napoleonic Wars, included hundreds of German-speaking states. During the French administration of those states, a nationalist movement arose that was determined to free Germany from foreign rule and create a unified country. Among the organizations active in that cause was the Lützowian Free Corps, whose members wore uniforms of black with gold and red accessories. Other groups, including the Jena Students’ Association, subsequently adopted the same three colours for their flags. The 1832 mass rally at Hambach included thousands of students from throughout Germany marching under a horizontal tricolour of black-red-yellow (the latter colour the heraldic “gold”). Many people believed that those colours were derived from the black eagle (with red beak and claws) appearing on the gold shield of the Holy Roman Empire, even though this was not the inspiration for the tricolour. That flag was also briefly used by the German Confederation of 1848–52.

When Germany was unified at the end of the 19th century, the national flag had stripes of black-white-red. After the defeat of the Second Reich in World War I, that flag was replaced by the black-red-yellow under the Weimar Republic. Many Germans, however, rallied around other flags they felt better represented the true German spirit. The red banner of the communists, the black-white-red of the Second Reich, and the new swastika flag of the Nazis all contended for allegiance. From 1933 to 1945 the Nazi symbols were dominant. The Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) restored the old black-red-yellow flag on May 9, 1949, and the government made use of a similar flag with the eagle shield in the centre. The plain tricolour was also used in the communist-dominated German Democratic Republic (GDR East Germany), although its coat of arms was added to the tricolour in 1959. The GDR flag disappeared in 1990 when the two Germanys were reunited as a single state. No changes were made in the symbols of the Federal Republic at the time of reunion.


The beginning of a myth

The flag’s origin isn’t entirely clear. It seems to begin with a simple illustration accompanying an essay by Benjamin Franklin in 1754, 20 years before American independence. The image, possibly drawn by Franklin himself, portrays the American Colonies as parts of a divided snake, simply stating “Join, or Die.” The essay it accompanied addressed the major current issue for British colonists in North America: the threat of the French and their Native American allies.

Later, as the American Revolution took shape, the image took on a new meaning. Colonists hoisted various flags, including ones depicting rattlesnakes, a distinctly American creature believed to strike only in self-defense. The flag commonly known as the “First Navy Jack” had 13 red and white stripes, and possibly a timber rattlesnake with 13 rattles, above the words “Don’t Tread On Me.”

In 1775, as the American Revolution began, South Carolina politician Christopher Gadsden expanded on Franklin’s idea, and possibly the red-and-white flag as well, when he created the yellow flag with a coiled rattler and the same phrase: “Don’t Tread On Me.”

Gadsden was a slave owner and trader, who built Gadsden’s Wharf in Charleston, South Carolina, which was a major slave-trading site. As many as 40% of enslaved Africans who were brought to the U.S. first arrived there. The site is slated to be the home of the International African American Museum, which estimates that 150,000 captured Africans came through the wharf, and that between 60% and 80% of today’s African Americans can trace an ancestor to the trade there.


5. Turkish Flag Legends

The Battle of Kosovo

There are many different legends said to have influenced the overall look of the flag. One of the most famous of these legends stems from the Battle of Kosovo, which occurred in 1448. It was a battle between Lazlar, a Siberian prince, and the Ottoman sultan Murad I, which ended in a victory for the Ottoman Empire.

It is said that when one of the commanders was looking about the war-torn field, they saw a reflection of the star and crescent in a pool of blood. This is where the flag gets its striking red color.

Ottoman Sultan’s Dream

A second legend references a dream that the first Ottoman Sultan, Osman I, had. In the tale, the sultan wished to marry the daughter of the judge of the Sharia court. One night, he had a dream where the moon and star symbol shot out of the judge’s chest and into the sultan’s chest. Once the characters reached the sultan’s chest, a large tree with billowing branches came to life and engulfed everything in a shadow.

When the Ottoman Empire overtook the city of Constantinople in 1453, the reigning empire decided to use the symbols in the sultan’s dream because they were thought to be a good omen.

Goddess Diana

Diana was the goddess of the hunt, wild animals, domestic animals, and the fertility deity believed to help women through conception and childbirth. The symbols in the flag are thought to honor her in some way. Theory dictates the city of Byzantium (which would eventually become Istanbul) picked out these symbols in honor of Diana.


The Nonbinary Trans Flag

Up to this point in history, people who identified as both nonbinary and trans either had to use both flags or use neither. Now, nonbinary trans folks have their own unique flag to fly with pride.

Naturally, most transgender people would like to be inclusive of nonbinary people and visa versa. Thus, this new flag embraces both of these identities in a single six-striped flag.

This nonbinary trans flag is a combination of the colors of the trans pride flag and the nonbinary pride flag, merged into one.


Psychosocial Flags [ edit | edit source ]

Psychosocial flags have been subdivided over the years to reflect the different interactions that can affect recovery. As a result, they are now referred to as yellow, blue and black flags [5] . Briefly, yellow flags cover the features of the person which affect how they manage their situation with regard to thoughts, feelings and behaviours. Blue flags concern the workplace and the employee’s perceptions of health and work. And black flags are about the context and environment in which that person functions, which includes other people, systems and policies. Black flags can block or limit the helpful activity of healthcare providers and workplace support.

Orange Flags [ edit | edit source ]

Screening for orange flags is performed by asking questions regarding clinical depression or other personality disorders. Screening for clinical depression is completed with the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 (PHQ-2) [6] . The purpose of the PHQ-2 is not to diagnose depression, but rather screen for it in a "first-step" approach.

Patient Health Questionnaire-2 [ edit | edit source ]

Over the past 2 weeks, how often have you been bothered by any of the following problems?

Answers: 0-Not at all, 1-Several days, 2-More than half the days, 3-Nearly every day

Scoring: 0 points for "Not at all" answer, 1 point for "several days", 2 points for "more than half the days", and 3 points for "nearly every day. The cutoff score for screening purposes is 3. If the individual scores >3, continue with the PHQ-9 for further assessment of depression.

Yellow Flags [ edit | edit source ]

Obstacles that can be classed as yellow flags include many aspects of thoughts, feelings and behaviours. Some common examples include:

  • Catastrophising – thinking the worst
  • Finding painful experiences unbearable, reporting extreme pain disproportionate to the condition
  • Having unhelpful beliefs about pain and work – for instance, ‘if I go back to work my pain will get worse’
  • Becoming preoccupied with health, over-anxious, distressed and low in mood
  • Fear of movement and of re-injury
  • Uncertainty about what the future holds
  • Changes in behaviour or recurring behaviours
  • Expecting other people or interventions to solve the problems (being passive in the process) and serial visits to various practitioners for help with no improvement.

Blue Flags [ edit | edit source ]

Blue flags can be considered in terms of the employee and the workplace. The employee often has fears and misconceptions about work and health based on their own previous experiences or those of others in the company they work for, or stories from the neighbours. Blue flags can include:

  • Concerns about whether the person is able to meet the demands of the job
  • Low job satisfaction
  • Little or poor support at work
  • A perception that the job is very stressful
  • An accommodating approach in the workplace to providing altered duties or modified work options to facilitate a return to work
  • Poor communication between employer and employee.

Black Flags [ edit | edit source ]

There is some overlap between blue and black flags, but they can be primarily distinguished by the black flags being those that are outside the immediate control of the employee and/or the team trying to facilitate the return to work. Black flags include:

  • Misunderstandings among those involved
  • Financial issues and/or claims procedures
  • Sensationalist media reports
  • Family and friends with strong unhelpful beliefs influencing the employee
  • Social isolation and becoming disconnected from the workforce

Poor or unhelpful company policies. Often company policies can take two forms: either there is no policy or inadequate policy surrounding sickness absence management and return to work, or there is rigid management of absence within a disciplinary policy system that does not allow sufficient flexibility to deal with genuine injury and illness rehabilitation needs.


The beginning of a myth

The flag’s origin isn’t entirely clear. It seems to begin with a simple illustration accompanying an essay by Benjamin Franklin in 1754, 20 years before American independence. The image, possibly drawn by Franklin himself, portrays the American Colonies as parts of a divided snake, simply stating “Join, or Die.” The essay it accompanied addressed the major current issue for British colonists in North America: the threat of the French and their Native American allies.

Later, as the American Revolution took shape, the image took on a new meaning. Colonists hoisted various flags, including ones depicting rattlesnakes, a distinctly American creature believed to strike only in self-defense. The flag commonly known as the “First Navy Jack” had 13 red and white stripes, and possibly a timber rattlesnake with 13 rattles, above the words “Don’t Tread On Me.”

A flag showing a design possibly used by the early U.S. Navy. Petty Officer 2nd Class Steven L. Shepard/U.S. Navy/Wikimedia Commons

In 1775, as the American Revolution began, South Carolina politician Christopher Gadsden expanded on Franklin’s idea, and possibly the red-and-white flag as well, when he created the yellow flag with a coiled rattler and the same phrase: “Don’t Tread On Me.”

Gadsden was a slave owner and trader, who built Gadsden’s Wharf in Charleston, South Carolina, which was a major slave-trading site. As many as 40% of enslaved Africans who were brought to the U.S. first arrived there. The site is slated to be the home of the International African American Museum, which estimates that 150,000 captured Africans came through the wharf, and that between 60% and 80% of today’s African Americans can trace an ancestor to the trade there.

In 2015, a demonstrator held up the Gadsden flag to protest a visit by President Barack Obama. AP Photo/Ryan Kang


Wales history: Why is the red dragon on the Welsh flag?

It is flown across the world to mark sporting events and St David's Day every 1 March.

But do you know where the flag came from, and why it features a red dragon?

The answer is both old and new.

Graham Bartram, of the Flag Institute, said: "The Welsh flag we know today - a large red dragon on a white and green background - only came into being in 1959.

"But, in fact, the red dragon as an emblem has been used in Wales since the reign of Cadwaladr (Cadwallader), King of Gwynedd from around 655AD."

Or even before this, according to Mared Llywelyn who wrote her Aberystwyth University Masters research on the dragon. She said it was largely popularised across Britain by the Romans, who used to fix bronze and silk dragons to their lances during battle.

"The Romans used the dragon as a war emblem and it is believed that they had a military flag called the draco, which was a piece of cloth on a long pole that made a hissing sound when the wind blew through it, it would have looked very similar to a dragon from afar," she said.

During the 5th and 10th Centuries, dragons increased in popularity across Britain, moving from a more serpent like image to a creature often with four legs and wings.

According to Ms Llywelyn, the words dragon and dreic appeared in early Welsh texts from the 6th Century.

While in the 12th Century legend of Merlin, two sleeping dragons - one red, one white - wake up and begin fighting, coming to represent the struggle between the Welsh (red) and the English (white).

Such was the fascination with the mythical creatures that when ruler Owain Glyndŵr attacked Caernarfon Castle in 1401, he reportedly flew a flag depicting a golden dragon.

Mr Bartram said: "In later centuries, a white dragon was used to represent the Anglo-Saxons poetically, while a yellow dragon on a red background was used by the kingdom of Wessex."

Still, the red dragon often reigned supreme, with many Welsh poets writing about it.

Miss Llywelyn added: "Compared to other nations, the Welsh have had a positive relationship with the dragon over the centuries, with heroes praised for being dragon-like."

It was the Tudors, though, who helped cement the red dragon's place in history.

From the late 15th Century, Henry Tudor (later Henry VII) placed a red dragon on top of the Tudor colours of white and green during the Battle of Bosworth in 1485.

This was his attempt to prove that he was a descendant of Cadwaladr, King of Gwynedd and the last of the Briton Kings - his banner was originally the red dragon.

Such was its prolific position throughout history, in 1807, after the union of parliaments of Great Britain and Ireland, the red dragon was adopted as an emblem for Wales.

The essence of this design was then used to form the first official Welsh flag, created for the Queen's coronation in 1953.

It comprised a small red dragon, surrounded by a circle of Welsh words Y Ddraig goch ddyry cychwyn (the red dragon gives impetus).

This augmented badge was placed on a white flag and flown over government buildings on appropriate occasions.

But in 1958 the Gorsedd of Bards (comprising poets, writers and artists who have made a distinguished contribution to the Welsh language), expressed the wish that the red dragon flag be recognised as the national flag of Wales, instead of this augmented badge.

The design was changed in 1959 to the current flag.

This article was inspired by a question sent to us by Gillian Arnold, a Californian originally from Cardiff.

She said: "Although I have lived in California for 30 years, I still go back home to Cardiff to visit my family.

"My reason for asking about our flag is that I am fiercely Welsh and promote Wales all the time.

"People love our flag because it is so unusual. They ask why we have a dragon."


Watch the video: Hvor kommer Dannebrog fra? (August 2022).