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9 January 1942

9 January 1942


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9 January 1942

January 1942

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Eastern Front

Russians return to Smolensk Province



Year of the Horse

Years of the Horse include 1930, 1942, 1954, 1966, 1978, 1990, 2002, 2014, and 2026.

The Horse occupies the seventh position in the Chinese zodiac, after the Snake and before the Goat. Horse years recur according to the Chinese zodiac 12-year cycle.

You will get the following information on this page:


San Antonio Register (San Antonio, Tex.), Vol. 11, No. 49, Ed. 1 Friday, January 9, 1942

Weekly newspaper from San Antonio, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.

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eight pages : ill. page 20 x 15 in. Digitized from 35 mm. microfilm.

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Context

This newspaper is part of the collection entitled: Texas Digital Newspaper Program and was provided by the UT San Antonio Libraries Special Collections to The Portal to Texas History, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 406 times. More information about this issue can be viewed below.

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this newspaper or its content.

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Check out our Resources for Educators Site! We've identified this newspaper as a primary source within our collections. Researchers, educators, and students may find this issue useful in their work.

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UT San Antonio Libraries Special Collections

UTSA Libraries Special Collections seeks to build, preserve and provide access to our distinctive research collections documenting the diverse histories and development of San Antonio and South Texas. Our collecting priorities include the history of women and gender in Texas, the history of Mexican Americans, activists/activism, the history of the African American and LGBTQ communities in our region, the Tex-Mex food industry, and urban planning.


Ninth Infantry Division Association

The 9th Infantry Division (Division) was first activated during World War I, but was never deployed to Europe. Soon after the Great War, the Division was demobilized in 1919 and re-designated a regular Army unit in 1923 and placed on the inactive list.

On August 1, 1940, the 9th Division was reactivated and began training at Ft. Bragg, NC. The 9th Division was re-designated 9th Infantry Division August 1, 1942 and was deployed to North Africa in November 1942. The Division fought in eight campaigns in the European Theater from North Africa to the Elbe River in eastern Germany which included an amphibious landing in Sicily. The Division endured 23,277 causalities during WWII, the second highest causality rate among the 91 divisions during the war. (Source: Army Battle Casualties & Non-battle Deaths in WWII, Final Report, 1 December 1941-31 December 1946 Mediterranean & Europe.)

The Division was deactivated in January 1947 and then six months later was reactivated as a training division. In 1966 the Division was reactivated for deployment to Vietnam under General William C. Westmoreland, a veteran of the 47th Infantry Regiment and part of the 9th Division during WWII. The Division incurred 2,624 causalities and was inactivated in 1969, then reactivated in 1972 and served as an equipment testing Division at Ft. Lewis, Washington until 1991.

The Association was formed by the officers and men in May/June 1945 immediately following the conclusion of hostilities in Germany. The first reunion was held in New York City the next year and has held a national reunion every year since. The 75th Reunion will be held at Ft. Bragg next year. Recently, the Association changed from a 501(C) 19 veterans group to a 501(C) 3 not-for-profit group.


Following the death in January 1942 of her great-great-uncle and godfather, the Duke of Connaught, Princess Elizabeth was appointed on 24 February to succeed him as the Colonel of the Grenadier Guards.

HRH Princess Elizabeth (b.1926), seated and facing three-quarters right and wearing the uniform of Colonel of the Grenadier Guards.

Following the death in January 1942 of her great-great-uncle and godfather, the Duke of Connaught, Princess Elizabeth was appointed on 24 February to succeed him as the Colonel of the Grenadier Guards. To mark the occasion, the officers of the regiment presented the Princess with a diamond brooch in the form of the regimental badge, as seen in the portrait. The brooch was presented on 20 April 1942 at the Princess’s first official audience, and the following day - on her sixteenth birthday - an inspection of the Grenadier Guards was the Princess’s first official public engagement.

The Grenadier Guards are the most senior of the five regiments of Foot Guards - the others being the Coldstream Guards, the Scots Guards, the Irish Guards and Welsh Guards. Together, the Foot Guards serve as the personal troops of the Sovereign, guarding the Royal Family and fulfilling ceremonial functions as well as normal military duties. The Queen is Colonel-in-Chief of all five regiments.


9 January 1942 - History

Separate Tank Battalion Histories

Those with a link will take you to a battalion-published history.

First GHQ medium tank battalion in U.S. Army. Formed from 67th Infantry (medium tanks) at Fort Meade, Maryland, on 15 June 1940 under Lt. Col. Stephen G. Henry. Redesignated 70th Light Tank Battalion 7 October 1941. Company C detached 15 February 1942, sent to Iceland new Company C formed 19 May. Company A landed at Algiers 8 November 1942 as part of 39th ICT (infantry combat team, regimental), 1st Infantry Division. Landed in Sicily July 1943. Arrived England in November 1943, reequipped as standard tank battalion former Company C reattached as Company D. Landed D day on Utah Beach supporting 4th Infantry Division. Companies A and B used amphibious DD Shermans. Joined drive on Cherbourg and breakout at St. Lo. Fought at St. Pois, Villedieu, and Mortain, and entered Paris. Spearheaded 4th Infantry Division's drive into Belgium, entered Germany on 13 September 1944. Moved to Hürtgen Forest in November, where the battalion experienced some of the worst fighting of the war. Moved to Ardennes with the 4th Infantry Division in December, fighting in Battle of the Bulge. Crossed Rhine near Worms 29 March 1945, pursued retreating German forces. With TF Rodwell stormed SS stronghold in Aalen on 21 April. Crossed Danube 25 April at Langen. Ended war near Austrian border at Gmund, Miesbach, and Holz.

Organized 1 September 1940 out of four National Guard tank companies from New York, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Connecticut. Assembled at Fort Meade, Maryland, in February 1941 under Maj. Littleton A. Roberts. Reorganized as medium tank battalion June 1942. Landed in North Africa but saw first combat in Italy, landing at Salerno in September 1943. Landed at Anzio January 1944 and joined attack on Rome, during which battalion suffered high losses. Landed in southern France 15 August 1944. Usually attached to 45th Infantry Division, battalion joined drive to the Vosges Mountains. Fought in Lorraine and Alsace in November 1944. Slashed through Homburg and Kaiserslautern to Rhine with TF Dolvin March 1945. Company B DD tanks led river crossing on 25 March. Battalion entered Bamberg, Nürnberg , and Munich, where it ended war.

Activated 1 March 1943 at Camp Cambell, Kentucky, under Lt. Col. F. J. Simpson. Originally organized as special battalion equipped with CDL spotlight tanks. Landed in Liverpool on 1 May 1944 and shipped to France in August, where battalion stayed until reorganized as standard tank battalion after 23 October. Moved to front on 19 December 1944 in Übach, Germany, attached to 102d Infantry Division. Joined the assault across Roer River on 23 February 1945. Attacked northward, reaching Rhine at Krefeld. Crossed Rhine beginning 26 March attached to the 75th Infantry Division. Reattached to 102d Infantry Division for drive through Munster and across Weser River. Ended the war in Gardelegen.

Activated 1 March 1943 at Camp Cambell, Kentucky, under Maj. Ralph Talbott III. Transited England, debarked at Utah Beach 6 August 1944 confusingly, a 702d Tank Destroyer Battalion already deployed in same area. Attached to the 80th Infantry Division on 8 August, operated in Argentan-Bordeaux area during closure of Falaise Gap. Fought along Moselle River September and October 1944. Supported 80th Infantry Division offensive in vicinity of Metz in November. Moved to Luxembourg City upon outbreak of Battle of the Bulge. Joined 80th Infantry Division attack across Our and Sauer rivers into Siegfried Line in February 1945. Briefly attached to 76th Infantry Division in late February and advanced toward Trier. Advance to Rhine in March with TF Onaway, then shifted to Luxembourg to rejoin 80th Infantry Division. Crossed Rhine near Mainz on 28 March. Advanced rapidly through Germany, including Kassel, Gotha, Erfurt, Jena, Weimar, Gera, Bamberg, Nürnberg , and Regensburg.

Activated 20 September 1943 out of 3d Battalion, 81st Armored Regiment, 5th Armored Division at Pine Camp, New York, under Lt. Col. Richard W. Ripple. Landed in France 1 September 1944. Committed to battle near Krinkelt, Germany, 10 October 1944 attached to 28th Infantry Division. Participated in 28th Infantry Division's disastrous attack on Schmidt in November, during which Company A was destroyed. Withdrew to Luxembourg 20 November for intensive rehabilitation. On 16 December, battalion found itself in path of the German Ardennes offensive and shattered. Company C put into defensive positions on Meuse River on 1 January 1945 attached to 17th Airborne Division, battalion then moved to Belgium. Battalion deployed to Germany in April near Seebachin attached to the 89th Infantry Division. Last action at Neu Wursohnitz on 6 May.

Activated on 20 September 1943 from 3d Battalion, 40th Armored Regiment, 7th Armored Division under command of Lt. Col. Odis L. Harmon. Landed at Liverpool, England, 11 March 1944. Debarked at Utah Beach 10 July 1944. Attached to 8th Infantry Division, fought in Normandy during breakout and into Brittany. Much of battalion joined 83d Infantry Division in fighting at St. Malo, Dinard, and Brest. Performed “occupation” duty in Luxembourg in October and November 1944. Entered Hürtgen Forest on 19 November. On 12 December, 709th was attached to 78th Infantry Division for attack near the Kesternich-Simmarath Ridge. Participated in fighting in Colmar Pocket in February 1945. Joined race to Rhine in March. Crossed river on 3 April and fought in Ruhr industrial region. Entered military government status in late April 1945.

Activated on 20 September 1943 at Camp Gordon, Georgia, out of 3d Battalion, 11th Armored Regiment, 10th Armored Division, Maj. William E. Eckles commanding. Landed in France 29 and 30 June 1944. Battalion less Company A committed 2 July near St. Jore attached to 90th Infantry Division Company A attached to 82d Airborne Division. After breakout, battalion crossed Seine near Mayenne. Joined drive on Le Mans and closing of Falaise Pocket in August 1944. On 8 September near Landres, France, battalion had rare encounter with large German armored force (thirty-five tanks) and destroyed about half. Advanced to the Moselle near Metz in mid-September. Participated in fight for Maizieres-les-Metz in October and in Metz offensive in November. Deployed to Rippweiler, Luxembourg, on 7 January 1945 to join fighting around the Bulge. Battalion CO Lt. Col. George B. Randolph KIA 9 January. Reentered Germany in February in SHAEF reserve. Engaged in elimination of German forces west of Rhine in March, crossing Moselle River yet again. Advanced through series of small German towns in April, ending up at border with Czechoslovakia. Entered the Sudetenland in May 1945.

Activated 10 September 1943 at Camp Chaffee, Arkansas, out of 16th Armored Division under Lt. Col. Raymond W. Odor. Assigned to Armored Board, Fort Knox, Kentucky, testing new equipment, including M26 Pershing. Sailed for Europe 26 December 1944 and landed in France February 1945. Fired first shot 24 March at Rhine River, attached to 79th Infantry Division. After crossing Rhine, participated in operations in Ruhr Valley during April, including assault on Essen in support of 17th Airborne Division. Ended the war in Bottrop, Germany.

Activated on 10 January 1943 at Fort Lewis, Washington, under Lt. Col. Ralph Alexander, commanding. Committed on 15 July 1944 in Normandy near Sallen. After breakout, fought at Angers, Chartres, and Reims. Crossed the Moselle in early September and became embroiled in fighting around Metz. Joined fruitless assault on Fort Driant in October 1944. In November, supported 5th Infantry Division's drive into Metz and reduction of forts still holding out. Relieved elements of 778th Tank Battalion in Saarlautern east of Saar River On 17 December. Deployed northward to join fighting in Ardennes beginning 21 December. Remained in Luxembourg until February 1945, during which month the battalion conducted limited offensive operations against Siegfried Line with the 87th Infantry Division. Reached Rhine near Koblenz 13 March and crossed 25 March on rafts as part of the 87th Infantry Division assault. Dashed across Germany, reaching Saale River on 13 April. Crossed the Weisse Elster near Brockav on 16 April and went onto defensive.

Activated 1 February 1943 at Camp Rucker, Alabama, Maj. William H. Dodge, commanding. Organized as special battalion equipped with top secret CDL spotlight tanks. Arrived in the United Kingdom on 1 April 1944 and Utah Beach in August. Reorganized as standard tank battalion November and attached to 94th Infantry Division in St. Nazaire-Lorient sector. Again selected for special equipment--DD tanks to be used for crossing of the Rhine--to which one company was devoted. Moved to front on 26 January 1945 and joined attack on Kesternich. Reached Rhine March with 83d Infantry Division. Company C DD tanks supported Rhine crossing. Reached Elbe River at Barby on 13 April. Contacted Russian forces 4 May 1945.

Activated 1 February 1943 at Fort Lewis, Washington, with Col. S. L. Buracker, commanding. Arrived in England 12 February 1944. Debarked at Omaha Beach 12 July and attached to 35th Infantry Division. While with that division, fought at St. Lo, Mortain, and Le Mans. First tank battalion of Third Army to cross Moselle and Meurthe rivers. Entered Germany east of Sarreguemines on 15 December 1944. On 22 December, redeployed to the Ardennes and joined 5th Infantry Division. Supported division's crossing of Sauer River January 1945 and drive through Siegfried Line to Bitburg in February. Drove along Moselle to the Rhine and then south as part of envelopment of German forces in March. Crossed Rhine 25 March near Russelheim, raced to Frankfurt am Main. Turned north toward Ruhr Pocket in April, then conducted 520-mile road march to return to the Third Army, reaching Bavaria on 1 May. Entered Czechoslovakia south of Winterberg on 3 May 1945.

Activated on 16 February 1943 at Fort Benning, Georgia, under command of Lt. Col. Raymond W. Odor. Reorganized on 19 November 1943 as special battalion equipped with top secret CDL spotlight tanks. Arrived in England April 1944. In September, mission changed to operation of special equipment for breaching and clearing minefields. On 12 October 1944, redesignated 738th Medium Tank Battalion, Special (Mine Exploder). Debarked at Le Havre, France, on 11 November 1944 and moved to Aachen, Germany. On 7 December 1944, Company A attached to 3d Armored Division, cleared roads during capture of Obergeich. Performed almost daily missions attached to diverse units thereafter.

Activated on 1 March 1943 at Fort Lewis, Washington, under command of Maj. Bethuel M. Kitchen. Reorganized in December 1943 as special battalion equipped with CDL spotlight tanks. Arrived in England August 1944. On 12 October, mission changed to operation of special equipment for breaching and clearing minefields battalion redesignated 739th Medium Tank Battalion, Special (Mine Exploder). One company obtained flamethrower tanks--probably British Crocodiles supplied for evaluation. Departed for Netherlands on 28 November 1944. On 18 December, one platoon of Company C detonated mines near Süggerath. Beginning in January 1945, mine-clearing elements performed almost daily missions attached to diverse units. Flamethrower platoon first used in Jülich, Germany, on 7 February. In late February, battalion supplied tank drivers to operate LVTs used to ferry personnel and equipment across Roer River during assault. In March, one company detached for training in use of DD tanks. Company B deployed CDLs on 23 March during Rhine crossing. CDL tanks used again twice in April, once in failed effort to capture bridges near Henrichenburg and again to illuminate bridge construction across Dortmund-Ems Canal and Lippe River.

Activated on 1 March 1943 at Fort Knox, Kentucky, under command of Maj. Harry C. Anderson. Reorganized 10 September 1943 as special battalion to be issued CDL spotlight tanks, but never received equipment despite considerable special training. Arrived in Belgium November 1944 with no tanks but with order to convert to standard tank battalion. Clashed with Peiper’s spearhead in December 1944 in first action. Attached to 82d Airborne Division in January 1945, attacked north side of the Bulge. Assaulted Siegfried Line in February. Crossed the Roer with 8th Infantry Division on 24 March and joined drive on Cologne. After reaching the Rhine, transferred 350 miles south and attached to 63d Infantry Division for another attack through Siegfried Line toward Saarbrucken. Returned to 8th Infantry Division to hammer at Ruhr Pocket in April 1945, after which took on occupation duties in Düsseldorf .

Activated on 15 March 1942 at Fort Meade, Maryland, under command of Lt. Col. Jacob R. Moon. Two companies equipped with DD tanks, and battalion formed part of assault wave at Omaha Beach on 6 June 1944 attached to 1st Infantry Division. Reattached to 2d Infantry Division in Normandy and participated in breakthrough at Vire River in July and August. Reached Paris 27 August. Advanced through France and Belgium, reaching Siegfried Line on 13 September. Attacked toward Roer River with 2d Infantry Division on 13 December 1944, turned south at outbreak of German Ardennes Offensive. Supported 2d Infantry Division push to eliminate Bulge and drive into Germany in January and February 1945. Crossed Rhine at Remagen in March, reached Weser River on 5 April. Entered Leipzig 19 April and Czechoslovakia 5 May near Pilsen.

Activated as a light tank battalion on 16 May 1942 at Fort Lewis, Washington, under command of Maj. John Upham. Redesignated as medium tank battalion on 19 August 1942. Arrived in England November 1943. Two companies equipped with DD tanks, and battalion formed part of the assault wave at Omaha Beach on 6 June 1944 attached to 1st Infantry Division. On 14 June, attached to 30th Infantry Division, with which battalion fought for rest of war. Participated in St. Lo Breakout in July and Battle of Mortain in August 1944. Entered Belgium on 3 September 1944. Company A supported capture of Fort Eben Emael on 10 September. Supported operations against Siegfried Line in October and attack to Roer River beginning 16 November 1944. Shifted to Ardennes on 17 December, fighting in Malmedy, Stavelot, and Stoumont. Took part in attack on Bulge from the north in January 1945. Shifted back to Aachen area in February and supported Ruhr River crossing. On 24 March, with one DD-equipped company of 736th Tank Battalion attached, crossed the Rhine near Spellen. Raced across Germany, entering Magdeburg (the last major city on autobahn to Berlin) on 16 April 1945. Ended war there.

744th Light Tank Battalion

Activated on 27 April 1942 at Camp Bowie, Texas, under command of Maj. Richard J. Hunt. Arrived in England 9 January 1944. Debarked at Utah Beach on 29 June 1944. First combat on 26 July near St. Germain in support of 2d Infantry Division. After breakout, attached to 28th Infantry Division for drive to the Seine. On 19 September 1944, moved to Netherlands where it supported 113th Cavalry Group and Belgian Brigade for two months. Moved to Frelenberg, Germany, in November 1944 and joined attacks on fortifications near Süggerath, after which entered Corps reserve. Crossed the Roer with 30th Infantry Division on 24 February 1945, fighting through Hambach Forest. Crossed Rhine on 23 March and fought in Ruhr area with 75th Infantry Division. Took up occupation in Olpe.

Activated on 15 August 1942 at Camp Bowie, Texas, under command of Maj. Thomas B. Burns. Formed part of the assault echelon at Omaha Beach on D day, landing its first company on 6 June 1944 in support of 1st Infantry Division. Fought in St. L™ breakout and envelopment of Falaise Pocket. Raced east in wake of 3d Armored Division. Supported 1st Infantry Division near and in Aachen in September 1944 and attack toward Roer River beginning 16 November. Ordered south with 1st Infantry Division on 16 December to help stop Ardennes offensive, continued to support division against Bulge and Siegfried Line through February 1945. Participated in assault across Roer River on 25 February. Reached Rhine at Bonn on 11 March. Crossed Rhine into Remagen bridgehead. Took part in Ruhr Pocket envelopment in April. Crossed Weser River and advanced into Harz Mountains and then to the Czechoslovakian border, where further movement eastward was halted on 7 May 1945.

Activated on 20 August 1942 at Camp Rucker, Alabama, under command of Maj. Loveaire A. Hedges. Shipped to England January 1944. Formed part of the assault echelon at Utah Beach on D day, landing on 6 June 1944 in support of 82d Airborne Division and 4th Infantry Division. Participated in capture of Cherbourg and the defense of Carentan. Supported 9th Infantry Division breakthrough near Villedieu-les-Poeles in August 1944 and race across France to the Belgian border. Fought in Hürtgen Forest September and October. Transferred to Belgium and supported attack toward Ruhr River in November. Attacked again toward Roer River in January 1945. Advanced to Rhine in March, crossing Remagen bridge (first separate tank battalion to cross the river). Advanced to Ruhr Pocket in April 1945. Shifted east to Harz Mountains, ending war along Mulde River.

Activated on 10 November 1942 at Camp Bowie, Texas, under command of Maj. Sidney G. Brown Jr. Shipped to England February 1944. Landed at Omaha Beach on 7 June 1944 and joined 29th Infantry Division. Aided in closing Falaise Pocket in August. Attacked toward Brussels and then Bastogne in September, entering Germany near Sevenig. Supported 29th Infantry Division's attack toward Roer River in November. Mopped up, fired across river December 1944 and January 1945. Supported assault across the Roer on 23 February. In March, trained to operate LVTs. On 24 March, battalion LVTs attached to 30th Infantry Division participated in Rhine assault crossing. One company conducted brief operations against Ruhr Pocket in April, after which battalion took on military government duties, ending war in Schnega.

Activated on 20 August 1942 at Camp Rucker, Alabama. On 20 April 1943, reorganized as a special battalion equipped with CDL spotlight tanks. Shipped to Wales April 1944 and disembarked at Utah Beach on 24 August. Reorganized as standard tank battalion after 23 October. Moved to front on 20 January 1945 near Buschdorf, Germany, attached to 94th Infantry Division. Fought through West Wall defenses in February. Trained with DD and CDL tanks 1Ð15 March. Moved to Saarlautern area to support 65th Infantry Division operations against Siegfried Line defenses. Withdrawn again on 20 March to draw DD tanks, attached to 5th Infantry Division near Bad Kreuznach, Germany. Long road marches damaged many DDs, but a few crossed the Rhine on 23 March 1945. CDL tanks deployed to support bridging operations. Turned in all special tanks by mid-April 1945. Advanced with 65th Infantry Division to Danube at Gundelhausen. Entered Regensburg on 27 April. In early May, took Passau and entered Austria, ending war near Linz.

Activated on 2 December 1942 at Camp Bowie, Texas, under command of Maj. Donald Donaldson. Debarked at Utah Beach from England on 29 June 1944 and joined 79th Infantry Division. In August, raced across France, passing through Laval to Le Mans 79th Infantry Division was first American division to cross the Seine. Entered Belgium on 2 September, fighting near Neufchateau and vicinity of the Foret de Parroy. Months of grinding fighting against prepared defenses followed in drive to Saar River near Sarreguemines. Battled German Nordwind offensive in January 1945. On 13 March, attached to 71st Infantry Division for Seventh Army offensive through Siegfried Line to the Rhine. Crossed Rhine on 30 March at Mainz. Crossed the Weisse River on 13 April near Zeitz and went into defensive posture near Limbach until V-E Day.

Activated on 1 January 1943 at Fort Knox, Kentucky. Served as tank test unit. On 8 July, newly arrived CO Lt. Col. Sidney T. Telfords unofficially christened battalion the “Seven-five-zero,” a name that stuck. Sailed to England and then to Omaha Beach in September 1944. Attached to the 104th Infantry Division near Aachen, Germany, in October 1944. First real combat on 16 November in operations against Siegfried Line spent next month pushing toward Roer River. Participated in counterattack against Bulge December 1944 and January 1945. Supported crossing of Roer River on 23 February. Reached Cologne on Rhine River on 5 March. Crossed into Remagen bridgehead and swung north toward Ruhr Pocket in he wake of 3d Armored Division. Crossed Weser River and reached Halle in April. Encountered Russian forces on Mulde River after 21 April 1945.

Constituted on 16 December 1940, activated on 1 June 1941 at Fort Benning, Georgia, under command of Lt. Col. Robert B. Ennis. Landed in North Africa on 26 May 1943, Sicily on 10 July 1943, Italy on 9 September 1943, and southern France on 15 August 1944. Participated in drive toward Germany. In December, supported both the 3d and 36th Infantry divisions in fierce fighting in the Selestat-Ribeauville-Kaysersberg area, then moved with the 36th into the Strasbourg area. Fought against German Nordwind offensive in January 1945. On 15 March, jumped off in support of 36th’s attack through Siegfried Line toward Rhine River. Crossed Rhine under Corps control in April, attached to 63d Infantry Division for limited pursuit of enemy and cleaning up bypassed strongpoints, including Heilbronn. Located in Kufstein, Austria, when cease-fire orders received on 7 May 1945.

Activated (originally as light tank battalion) on 1 June 1941 at Fort Lewis, Washington. Landed in North Africa on 24 January 1943, Italy on 17 September 1943, and southern France on 15 August 1944. Companies A and B equipped with DD tanks for landing near St. Tropez. Drove to Belfort Gap with 3d Infantry Division. Fought in Vosges Mountains, entered Strasbourg on 26 November 1944. Fought in Colmar Pocket January and February 1945. Supported 3d Infantry Division in late March through Siegfried Line and across Rhine near Worms, crossing on 26 March. Company C supported crossing with DD tanks. Participated in assault on Nürnberg 17Ð20 April. Attacked south through Augsburg and Munich, formed part of the spearhead that seized Berchtesgaden and Salzburg in early May 1945.

759th Light Tank Battalion

Activated on 1 June 1941 at Fort Knox, Kentucky, under command of Lt. Col. Kenneth C. Althaus. Stationed in Iceland for eleven months and finally shipped to the United Kingdom in August 1943. Landed in Normandy on 16 June 1944 and was committed attached to 2d Infantry Division. From 21 August 1944 until end of the war, attached to 4th Cavalry Group. Passed through Chartres and crossed the Seine on 26 August 1944 crossed the Meuse River at Dinant and liberated Celles, Rauersim, Stavelot, and Malmedy. Entered Germany on 13 September. Ordered into the Ardennes in December. Spent early 1945 in defensive positions or out of the line. Reached Rhine River on 5 March at Zons. Captured series of obscure German towns in April, ending month in Aschersleben, where occupation duty began.

Activated on 1 April 1942 at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana, as a light tank battalion manned by black enlisted personnel. Major Edward E. Cruise assumed command. First black officers joined in July 1942. Converted to medium tank battalion in September 1943. Arrived in England in September 1944 and France on 10 October. Saw first action on 8 November with Third Army. Entered Germany on 14 December. Participated in American counteroffensive after the Battle of the Bulge from 31 December 1944 to 2 February 1945. In March served as spearhead of 103d Infantry Division in penetrating Siegfried Line. Among first American units to link with Soviet forces, doing so on 5 May 1945 in Steyr, Austria.

Activated on 10 September 1943 at Camp Bowie, Texas, as part of reorganization of 4th Armored Division. Lieutenant Colonel Jack C. Childers assumed command. Probably landed in France in October 1944. Saw first combat attached to 102d Infantry Division on 21 November. Fought along Roer River until 21 December, when sent to Ardennes with 84th Infantry Division. Joined breakthrough from Metzerath, Germany, in February 1945. Reached Rhine at Homburg on 4 March. On 19 March, attached to 17th Airborne Division, with which battalion was to link after paratroopers landed as part of Rhine River assault. Crossed river night of 25 March, linked up, attacked eastward. Reached Hanover on 10 April. Reached vicinity of Elbe River by midmonth. Took up occupation duties in the vicinity of Salzwedel, Germany, on 4 May 1945.

Activated on 20 September 1943 at Pine Camp, New York, under temporary command of Maj. L. L. Willard. Disembarked at Le Havre, France, on 8 February 1945. Crossed Rhine on 27 March and saw first real combat at Mannheim. Marched along Main River to Werbachhausen and across the Danube to Ulm in April. Operating in area of Imst, Austria, when hostilities in sector ended on 5 May 1945.

“Blackcat” battalion activated on 20 September 1943 at Fort Benning, Georgia, from 1st Battalion, 31st Armored Regiment, 7th Armored Division, under command of Lt. Col. N. K. Markle Jr. Arrived in Scotland on 12 July 1944 disembarked at Utah Beach on 24 August. Helped 83d Infantry Division protect Patton’s right in September. Entered Luxembourg in October, then participated in operations along Moselle River. Moved to Hürtgen Forest in December 1944 to support the 83d Infantry Division's drive toward Ruhr River. Supported 83d Infantry Division operations against north flank of the Bulge in January 1945 and the 78th Infantry Division capture of the Roer River dams. Crossed Rhine via the Remagen bridge in March, then attacked Ruhr Pocket in April. Raced 280 miles southeastward to join 101st Airborne Division in drive toward mythical Nazi National Redoubt in Alps near Berchtesgaden. Ended war near Kempfenhausen, Germany.

Activated on 20 September 1943 at Fort Gordon, Georgia, from 1st Battalion, 3d Armored Regiment, 10th Armored Division. Arrived in England on 27 December 1944 disembarked at Le Havre, France, on 6 February 1945. Took part in Operation Damnation in April attached to 69th Infantry Division, in turn attached to 9th Armored Division. Crossed Weser River, and Company C entered Colditz on 15 April, liberating five hundred French officers and StalinÕs son. Other tanks entered Leipzig on the 18 April. Moved to Thrana in early May 1945.

Activated on 20 September 1943 at Camp Barkeley, Texas, under command of Lt. Col. Frank J. Spettel. Shipped to France in September 1944. Joined battle around Metz attached to 95th Infantry Division on 15 November, including fighting in Maizieres-les-Metz. Supported 95th Infantry Division's attack across Saar River in December and helped clear Saarlautern held defensive positions in this area into February 1945. Beginning 6 February, most of battalion attached to 94th Infantry Division to support its operations against the Siegfried Switch line of fortifications. Crossed Rhine with 26th Infantry Division on 25 March. Supported the division's advance across Germany behind 11th Armored Division in April in direction of Linz, Austria. Advanced toward Prague until 7 May 1945.

Activated (originally as light tank battalion) on 2 January 1943 at Fort Knox, Kentucky, under command of Lt. Col. Harry L. Kinne Jr. Arrived at Marseilles in October 1944. Entered combat in Alsace on 7 December attached to 100th Infantry Division, which was attacking toward Maginot Line stronghold of Bitche. From December 1944 to January 1945, battalion supported five different Infantry Divisions, entering Germany attached to 79th. Battled Nordwind offensive in January. Supported 100th Infantry Division attack that finally captured Bitche in March, then drove to Rhine near Mannheim. Crossed the river on 31 March and seized Heilbronn in April. Crossed Neckar River and swung toward Munich. Most of battalion entered Austria near Innsbruck in May, while Company C entered Brenner Pass with 103d Infantry Division.

Activated (originally as light tank battalion) on 1 February 1943 at Camp Cambell, Kentucky. Converted to standard tank battalion on 16 October. Shipped to France in January 1945, arriving at Le Havre. Moved into Germany at Aachen on 8 April. Attached to 97th Infantry Division on 23 April and saw first real action on 30 April at Wittichsthal. Entered Czechoslovakia on 4 May 1945 and ceased operations in vicinity of Sluzetin on 7 May.

Activated (originally as light tank battalion) on 1 April 1943 at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana, under command of Maj. George C. Dalia. One of three separate tank battalions with black enlisted personnel and mostly white officers. Reorganized as regular tank battalion on 15 September. Shipped to England in November 1944 and landed on Continent 25 December. Committed on 30 December attached to 104th Infantry Division near Eschweiler, Germany. Reattached to 35th Infantry Division on 4 February 1945 and crossed Roer River on 26 February. Formed part of Task Force Byrnes, which linked up with Canadian forces in Venlo, Netherlands, in early March. Crossed Rhine on 26 March and fought in Ruhr Pocket. By 15 April, was helping to clear woods west of Elbe River. Took on occupation duties in vicinity of Immensen on 27 April.

Activated on 20 September 1943 at Camp Chaffee, Arkansas, out of 1st Battalion, 47th Armored Regiment, 14th Armored Division. Major Charles F. Ryan assumed command. Shipped to United Kingdom, arriving December 1944, and landed at Le Havre, France, on 22 January 1945. Attached to 99th Infantry Division in February and moved to front near Weisweiler, Germany. Supported division's attack to Rhine near Düsseldorf in early March. Crossed Rhine at Remagen on 10 March. Advanced to Weid River, then conducted fast-moving operations along the Frankfurt- Düsseldorf autobahn. Conducted mop-up operations in Ruhr Pocket in April. On 17 April, transferred with 99th Infantry Division to Third Army and advanced to Bamberg. Ceased combat operations on 1 May 1945 near Landshut.

Activated on 10 September 1943 at Camp Chaffee, Arkansas, out of 3d Battalion, 16th Armored Regiment, 16th Armored Division. Major David L. Hollingsworth assumed command. Shipped to France, arriving in March 1945. Due to collision off Bermuda, ship carrying the battalion's equipment did not arrive until April 1945, by which time battalion had moved to Wurzburg, Germany. Between 3 and 6 May, conducted road march to join 86th Infantry Division near Erding. Entered Austria on 6 May 1945. Experienced no contact with the enemy.


This Week in AG History -- January 10, 1942

The Imperial Japanese Navy conducted a surprise military strike on the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on the morning of December 7, 1941. The following day the United States declared war on Japan, and within a few days America was fully embroiled in the Second World War.

How should the Assemblies of God respond to this world crisis? The January 10, 1942, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel published three articles addressing this pressing question.

Pentecostal Evangel Editor Stanley H. Frodsham, in an article titled, "Keeping Tranquil in a World of Turmoil," cautioned believers to not become caught up in the destructive patterns of the world. He predicted that the "insanity" of the nations would not last forever and instead urged Christians to remain calm. He admonished readers to act according to an eternal perspective, reminding them of Matthew 5:5, "the meek shall inherit the earth." Frodsham's irenic posture during the early years of the Second World War was in continuity with his earlier opposition to the First World War (1914-1918).

Raymond T. Richey shared a different perspective about the war. In an article titled, "Evangelizing at our Army Camps," he wrote about his experience as a military chaplain during both world wars. Richey was known for holding evangelistic meetings in his "patriotic tent" (which was constructed of red, white and blue cloth) and he saw thousands of soldiers accept Christ. He encouraged readers to pray for and support chaplains, suggesting that army camps &ldquopresent the greatest opportunity for home missionary work that ever has been.&rdquo

Evangelist E. Ellsworth Krogstad, in a sermon titled "Loyalty to Government and to God in the Present World Crisis," encouraged American Christians to be loyal to their government, which he claimed was "founded upon godly principles." He acknowledged America's imperfections, but he also "(thanked) God for the privilege of living in America." America was great, according to Krogstad, because it provided the &ldquogreatest liberty,&rdquo including freedom of speech, press, assembly, and worship.

The responses to the outbreak of the Second World War by Frodsham, Richey, and Krogstad demonstrate that early Pentecostals were not cookie-cutter thinkers. They each had their own perspectives on politics and world events. However, all agreed that American Christians needed to pray fervently and with great contrition. They took seriously the notion that the Christian&rsquos citizenship, ultimately, lay in heaven and not on earth. It was with this deep conviction that they encouraged readers, in the midst of global turmoil, to place their primary focus on things eternal.

Read the articles by Frodsham, Richey, and Krogstad in the January 10, 1942, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

* "Watchmen, What of the Night?" by Noel Perkin

* "Ezra Teaches Separation," by J. Bashford Bishop

* "The Sadhu," by Mary Warburton Booth

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.


British tank losses: January 1942

Post by Engländer » 13 Mar 2013, 01:23

I'm trying to get a detailed account of the tank losses suffered by the British 1st Armoured Division during Rommel's counter attack of January 1942.

I believe a total of 117 tanks were lost, 70 in the opening exchanges of battle, and 47 more during its withdrawal to Msus.

Does anyone know the losses per tank-type?

Re: British tank losses: January 1942

Post by ClintHardware » 25 Mar 2013, 22:01

I will be going to the National Archives at Kew, London soon do you want me to look at specific records for you? I believe 22nd Armoured Brigade had some losses then and I am interested in digging over it as a subject. What units are you wanting to know about? Give me your list.

Re: British tank losses: January 1942

Post by Engländer » 25 Mar 2013, 23:56

Primarily the tank losses suffered by the British between Jan 21st 1942, the date of Rommel's 'reconnaissance in force', and the capture of Msus on Jan 25th 1942.

I know that tank 'losses' are always vague, with confusion between those temporarily put out of action and later recovered to those actually destroyed.

I believe that the 9th Lancers and 10th Royal Hussars were involved as well as others but I don't have a detailed list.

Any information you can pick up would be warmly appreciated.

Re: British tank losses: January 1942

Post by Urmel » 26 Mar 2013, 12:07

It's close to impossible to get to the tank loss numbers. I have all the relevant war diaries, and the problem is that there is a starting figure, and an end figure, but then there are unclear numbers of tanks received from T.D.S. during the battle. The tank regiments involved were 9 Lancers, 10 Hussars, Queen's Bays, and 3/4 CLY composite regiment (with 1 Support Group).

PM me to take this further.

The enemy had superiority in numbers, his tanks were more heavily armoured, they had larger calibre guns with nearly twice the effective range of ours, and their telescopes were superior. 5 RTR 19/11/41

Re: British tank losses: January 1942

Post by Engländer » 26 Mar 2013, 12:34

Thanks for that, will send you a PM/

Re: British tank losses: January 1942

Post by Urmel » 13 Jul 2014, 18:29

Just turned up the following from German intel reports:

1) Tank arrivals in Mersa Matruh, 16 Dec 41
2 Armoured Brigade
Staff 9xM3, 1xMk.VI
Bays 17xM3, 35x Mk.VI
9 Lancers 17xM3, 35x Mk.VI
10 Hussars 17xM3, 32x Mk.VI
Total 60xM3, 103x Mk.VI

18 January outside Antelat (no breakdown by type):
Bays 44
9 Lancers 46
10 Hussars 48
Total 138

Since they hadn't been in combat at that date, that means they lost about 15% of their tanks on the approach march due to mechanical issues. Considering that the march from Matruh was made on tracks all the way to Agedabia, that doesn't appear to be too bad.

The enemy had superiority in numbers, his tanks were more heavily armoured, they had larger calibre guns with nearly twice the effective range of ours, and their telescopes were superior. 5 RTR 19/11/41

Re: British tank losses: January 1942

Post by ClintHardware » 13 Jul 2014, 18:54

Re: British tank losses: January 1942

Post by Urmel » 13 Jul 2014, 19:14

Not systematically. There's this:

The enemy had superiority in numbers, his tanks were more heavily armoured, they had larger calibre guns with nearly twice the effective range of ours, and their telescopes were superior. 5 RTR 19/11/41

Re: British tank losses: January 1942

Post by Don Juan » 13 Jul 2014, 19:33

Would this have been along the coast road? I'm assuming the cut-across roads that are there today weren't there then. It makes a big difference - a change from @ 750 km to @ 1000 km.

This is interesting to me because I've got an RAC liaison report dated Sept '41 from the desert that actually praises the Crusader (imagine that!). It's usually assumed that the Crusader was unreliable from the moment it arrived in the Middle East, but this may not be the case - it may have had an early period where its reliability was fairly good.

Re: British tank losses: January 1942

Post by Urmel » 14 Jul 2014, 00:13

The enemy had superiority in numbers, his tanks were more heavily armoured, they had larger calibre guns with nearly twice the effective range of ours, and their telescopes were superior. 5 RTR 19/11/41

Re: British tank losses: January 1942

Post by Don Juan » 14 Jul 2014, 11:46

I think the losses might have been less than 15%, as the second total of 138 doesn't seem to include the staff tanks. So the losses look to be less than 10%. If we assume (not entirely unreasonably) that all the fall outs were Crusaders then 15% of them didn't make it.

The intriguing thing about the Crusader is that its reliability seemed to get worse over 1942. As far as I can tell, the main problem up to Operation CRUSADER was the fan drive, but from early 1942 the water pump emerged as the major problem, and as 1942 progressed it became pretty much the only significant issue.

Weirdly, Home Forces Crusaders hardly had any problems with the water pump. I'm far from convinced that the reliability issues with the Crusader in the desert were either design or manufacturing related, despite the problems that were encountered with the latter.

Re: British tank losses: January 1942

Post by Urmel » 28 Dec 2014, 19:12

I have now made the whole of the German message whence the tank numbers originated available, if anyone wants to be able to source it.

The enemy had superiority in numbers, his tanks were more heavily armoured, they had larger calibre guns with nearly twice the effective range of ours, and their telescopes were superior. 5 RTR 19/11/41

Re: British tank losses: January 1942

Post by Urmel » 08 Jun 2015, 07:19

The enemy had superiority in numbers, his tanks were more heavily armoured, they had larger calibre guns with nearly twice the effective range of ours, and their telescopes were superior. 5 RTR 19/11/41


“War Time” Daylight Saving Begins: February 9, 1942

On February 9, 1942, “War Time”&mdasha year-round daylight saving time&mdashbegan in the United States. Passed by Congress and signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the year-round daylight saving time required that clocks be moved ahead one hour for the remainder of the war as a national defense measure to conserve energy.

America first implemented a partial-year daylight saving time in March 1918, during World War I, and though there was popular support for the wartime measure, there was also disapproval, primarily from farmers and the railroads. The national daylight saving time was repealed after the war ended, but it continued on at the local level, especially in the North, East, and parts of the Midwest.

A national daylight saving time was again implemented during World War II, but this time, rather than lasting only part of the year, daylight saving time lasted all year. The purpose of “War Time,” as this form of daylight saving time was called, was to conserve power and provide extra daylight for war industries to increase production. As with World War I, after World War II ended, the national daylight saving time was quickly repealed, but it remained a local issue, with each state, city, and even business deciding whether it would adopt daylight saving time or not.

This patchwork form of daylight saving time caused much inconvenience and confusion, and in 1966 a national law was signed calling for daylight saving time to fall from the last Sunday in April to the last Sunday in October, with the option for states to exempt themselves. The energy crisis of the 1970s once again prompted the adoption of a year-round daylight saving time beginning in January 1974, but it actually only lasted 10 months, as legislation was signed adjusting yet again the time period of daylight saving time.

Another bill was signed in 1986 that moved daylight saving time to the period from the first Sunday in April to the last Sunday of October. This remained the law for many years until the most recent daylight saving legislation, implemented in 2007, set daylight saving time from the second Sunday in March to the first Sunday in November.


February 1942

There is no shortage of wartime reporting in our historic newspapers about any major conflict throughout history, with some newspapers even releasing special wartime issues to further cover military and naval news. February 1942 was no exception as newspapers printed articles on the Battle of Singapore, the Western Desert Campaign, and the rationing on the home front caused by the ongoing world war.

The Battle and Fall of Singapore

Perhaps the most significant event of February 1942 was the battle, and subsequent fall, of Singapore. This February marks 75th anniversary of the battle, which resulted in a decisive Japanese victory and the ‘worst disaster’ in British military history. After an intense siege from Japanese forces, over 80,000 Allied soldiers surrendered to capture, half of whom would never return home.

Singapore was strategically important for naval movements between the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean during the Second World War. Japanese forces had been advancing southwards through the jungles of the Malaya peninsula since December 1941. The number of soldiers under the command of Lieutenant-General Tomoyuki Yamashita was heavily overestimated, or over reported, by the Allied Forces. It was reported that Yamashita had 100,000 Imperial troops poised for operations in Singapore, but the actual number of troops was closer to 35,000.

The British-led Allied Forces in Singapore were under the command of Lieutenant-General Percival, and fought bitterly until they were forced to surrender unconditionally on the 15 th of February. Winston Churchill later called the fall of Singapore ‘the worst disaster and largest capitulation in British history’. Check back in on the 15th February for a more in-depth look at the coverage of the Fall of Singapore.

The Western Desert Campaign

By the end of February 1942, Axis Forces in Libya under the command of General Rommel had almost reached El Gazala, where they would hold the line until the Battle of Gazala began the following May.

The R.A.F. in particular would continue to harass Rommel’s troops throughout February, causing him to have to spread his forces thin across his front line.

News at Home

Soap rationing began in February 1942, making it the first non-food commodity to be rationed in Britain. Rations booklets would now include one coupon a week for all kinds of soap.

Some of the newspapers on The British Newspaper Archive have been scanned from bound books, so some pages might have stories tucked away at the curved edge of the newspaper. In this example, the Derby Knitting Fund reported that it had sent over 5,000 parcels to the Forces.

© 2021 Findmypast Newspaper Archive Limited - Proudly presented by Findmypast in partnership with the British Library


Watch the video: Háborús propaganda 959. filmhíradó 1942. júl. 2. hete (July 2022).


Comments:

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